The debates about the ratification of the us constitution

The Ratification Debate Ratifying the Constitution Once the Constitution of the United States was written in at the Philadelphia convention, the next step was ratification. This is the formal process, outlined in Article VII, which required that nine of the thirteen states had to agree to adopt the Constitution before it could go into effect. As in any debate there were two sides, the Federalists who supported ratification and the Anti-Federalists who did not.

The debates about the ratification of the us constitution

The United States Constitution was ratified inbut not without considerable debate. During the Constitutional Convention, delegates debated major issues such as the makeup of the legislature and the effect of slavery on representation.

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When the new constitution was up for ratification by the states, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton and John Jay had to write a series of pamphlets known as the "Federalist Papers" to convince Americans to ratify the constitution, as many were fearful of the increased power of the federal government.

The Articles, officially ratified inwere written by members of the Second Continental Congress, which had declared independence in and was overseeing the war effort against Britain. Under the Articles, the federal government was weak: There was no executive branch, and Congress had no power to tax, nor raise a standing army.

Recognizing that the Articles were insufficient to govern this new country, the states decided to call a Constitutional Convention in to meet in Philadelphia. The Legislature The major debate between the 55 delegates at the convention was over the type of legislature.

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Delegates of larger states called for seats in the legislature to be determined proportionally by population, while smaller states wanted each state, no matter the population, to have equal representation in Congress. Ultimately, the delegates would compromise by having a bicameral, or two-house, legislature, which included a House of Representatives determined by population and a Senate where each state had just two representatives.

The debates about the ratification of the us constitution

James Madison, architect of the compromise, would argue in "Federalist No. Slavery and Representation The second major issue was between northern and southern states over the issue of slavery. Many of the northern states sought to ban slavery entirely, and, failing that, at least to ban the importation of new slaves.

A compromise was reached whereby Congress could legislate against the slave trade, but not untileffectively protecting the trade for another 20 years, during which time there was a substantial rise in the importation of slaves into the South.

Timeline of drafting and ratification of the United States Constitution - Wikipedia

This new Constitution created a strong executive branch, which the Articles lacked, and gave Congress the power to tax and raise an army. Between andas the states considered ratification of the new Constitution, its primary author, James Madison, along with Alexander Hamilton and John Jay, wrote a series of pamphlets known as the "Federalist Papers," encouraging Americans to ratify the Constitution and convincing them of the need for the strong central government it created.

Ultimately, the states agreed to ratify the Constitution only if it included a Bill of Rights, currently the first ten amendments to the Constitution, which protect various individual rights.In and , following the Constitutional Convention, a great debate took place throughout America over the Constitution that had been proposed.

In the ratification debate, the Anti-Federalists opposed to the Constitution. They complained that the new system threatened liberties, and failed to protect individual rights. They complained that the new system threatened liberties, and failed to protect individual rights. Describe some of the debates over the Constitution that occurred in the nation’s press and state ratification conventions; Explain the extent to which the Constitution and the Framers advanced different ideas about democracy in the United States. Ratification Dates and Votes Advertisement Each of the original thirteen states in the United States was invited to ratify the Constitution created in Philadelphia in

The constitutional convention and ratification debate was very important in the making of the US Constitution. The dynamics, antagonism, considerations, process and the eventual consensus regarding the Constitution can be explained by discrete theories in political discourses.

The Constitution was sent to the states for ratification, and the stage was set for a debate on the merits of the Constitution, including the need for a bill of rights.

Perhaps the most important and radical thing about the ratification debate is that it was a debate. The Ratification Debate Ratifying the Constitution Once the Constitution of the United States was written in at the Philadelphia convention, the next step was ratification.

The Ratification Debate

Ultimately, during the ratification debate in Virginia, Madison conceded that a bill of rights was needed, and the Federalists assured the public that the first step of the new government would be to adopt a bill of rights.

It took 10 months for the first nine states to approve the Constitution. Ratification Dates and Votes Advertisement Each of the original thirteen states in the United States was invited to ratify the Constitution created in Philadelphia in

The Debate on the Constitution | Library of America